Before the development of radiometric dating techniques

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The second presentation at the April 2016 Bozeman young-Earth creation conference was “What You Haven’t Been Told About Radioisotope Dating” by Dr.Jake Hebert of the Institute for Creation Research.Radiometric dating--the process of determining the age of rocks from the decay of their radioactive elements--has been in widespread use for over half a century.There are over forty such techniques, each using a different radioactive element or a different way of measuring them.For each dating or chronological method there is a link in the box at right to take you to that section of this page.There, you will find a brief description of the method, plus links to take you to other webpages with more extensive information.However, human beings love to see factual precision, and we want to know how old something is.Please remember that all dating methods, even those termed "absolute," are subject to margins of error. That is a very small amount of possible error range. Modern studies almost always use two or more methods to confirm dating work and to build confidence in the results obtained.

Young-Earth creationists regularly attack radiometric dating techniques, thinking that if they discredit these methods they will undermine the idea of an ancient Earth, but this is not the case.

It has become increasingly clear that these radiometric dating techniques agree with each other and as a whole, present a coherent picture in which the Earth was created a very long time ago.

Further evidence comes from the complete agreement between radiometric dates and other dating methods such as counting tree rings or glacier ice core layers.

He was employed at Caltech's Division of Geological & Planetary Sciences at the time of writing the first edition.

He is presently employed in the Space & Atmospheric Sciences Group at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

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