Teenage power and control in dating statistics

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Any of these and more can be part of teen dating violence: Abusive teens use these kinds of behavior to keep power and control over a dating partner.

Teen dating violence occurs in straight and gay (LGTBQ) relationships.

Try not to let the differences in language keep you from being on the same page in talking with your kids about these relationships.

In this page we use “dating” as an inclusive term covering the range of adolescent romantic relationships ranging from casual, episodic encounters to longer-term, committed relationships. TDV can include physical abuse—things like hitting, pushing, slapping, or strangling a dating partner.

It may also include emotional or verbal abuse, behaviors like name-calling or insults.

Emotional abuse may include isolating a dating partner by trying to control the time they spend with friends and family, limiting the activities someone is involved in, or humiliating a dating partner through social sabotage.

Here is an easily printable version of the Power and Control Wheel.

Teen dating violence is defined as a pattern of actual or threatened acts of physical, sexual, and/or emotional abuse, perpetrated by an adolescent (between the ages of 13 and 18) against a current or former dating partner.

60% say that psychological abuse has occurred in their relationships.

Abuse may include insults, coercion, social sabotage, sexual harassment, threats and/or acts of physical or sexual abuse.

The abusive teen uses this pattern of violent and coercive behavior, in a heterosexual or same gender dating relationship, in order to gain power and maintain control over the dating partner. No boyfriend or girlfriend has the right to tell you what you can or should do, what you can or should wear, or what kind of friends you should have.

Many teens do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family. Youth who experience dating violence are more likely to experience the following: Communicating with your partner, managing uncomfortable emotions like anger and jealousy, and treating others with respect are a few ways to keep relationships healthy and nonviolent.

A 2011 CDC nationwide survey found that 23% of females and 14% of males who ever experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age. Teens receive messages about how to behave in relationships from peers, adults in their lives, and the media. Risks of having unhealthy relationships increase for teens who — Dating violence can be prevented when teens, families, organizations, and communities work together to implement effective prevention strategies.

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